Welcome to Hunter Specialty Anaesthesia

Book a Consult with Dr Rothwell

Welcome to Hunter Specialty Anaesthesia

Book a Consult with Dr Rothwell

Welcome to Hunter Specialty Anaesthesia

Book a Consult with Dr Rothwell

Types of Anaesthesia

On May 2nd 2017 by admin

Types of Anaesthesia

General anaesthesia

You are put into a state of unconsciousness for the duration of the operation. This is usually achieved by injecting drugs through a cannula placed in a vein and maintained with intravenous drugs or a mixture of gases which you will breathe. While you remain unaware of what is happening around you, the anaesthetist monitors your condition closely and constantly adjusts the level of anaesthesia. You will often be asked to breathe oxygen through a mask just before your anaesthesia starts.

Regional anaesthesia

A nerve block numbs the part of the body where the surgeon operates and may avoid the need for general anaesthesia. You may be awake, sedated or it may be combined with general anaesthesia. Examples of regional anaesthesia include epidurals for labour, spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section and ‘eye blocks’ for cataracts.

Local anaesthesia

A local anaesthetic drug is injected at the site of the surgery to cause numbness. You will be awake or sedated but feel no pain. Examples include removing small skin lesions or stitching up a cut.

Sedation

The anaesthetist administers drugs to make you relaxed and drowsy. This is sometimes called ‘twilight sleep’ or ‘intravenous sedation’ and may be used for some eye surgery, some plastic surgery and for some endoscopy procedures. Recall of events is possible with ‘sedation’ but you are comfortable. Most patients prefer to have little or no recall of events. Please discuss your preference with your anaesthetist.

Do I have a choice?

No matter what operation or procedure you are to undergo, you may ask your anaesthetist if there is any choice in the anaesthetic method. You should also understand that some surgeons are more comfortable operating on patients who have received one form of anaesthetic rather than another. This most often means that the patient has a general anaesthetic.

The surgeon does not choose the type of anaesthetic you will receive, unless there is no anaesthetist involved in your care. However, the surgeon may discuss the choice with you and with your anaesthetist. In the same way, your anaesthetist does not choose what operation you will have or how it will be carried out. Again, your anaesthetist may discuss your operation with you and your surgeon, particularly if you have special anaesthetic problems.

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HUNTER SPECIALTY ANAESTHESIA

HUNTER SPECIALTY ANAESTHESIA